Tuesday, April 20, 2010

Your Retirement Plan Directed by You


Today we are going to tackle the self-directed IRA. We all know what an Individual Retirement Account or IRA is. Briefly, it is the retirement tool for those of us who may not have access to a 401(k) that defers taxes for retirement. The deferring part is not really as complicated as it seems. In a 401(k), you have your contribution taken out before you pay taxes; in an IRA, you pay with after-tax money and then take the deduction when you file, basically subtracting the taxes from your contribution to be paid later.
How is a regular IRA different than a self-directed IRA?
The differences are not as obvious as the title of these products sounds. An IRA is an investment chosen by you and you direct the funds to it for your retirement. It seems like this should be called self-directed but in reality, it is very different from what the IRS views as a self-directed IRA.
In a self-directed IRA, you become the manager of the whole process. Rather than simply sending money to a mutual, fund company, the most common sponsors of IRAs, you direct the underlying investments. In the previous example, the institution is the middleman. In a self-directed IRA, the institution, whomever or whatever one you chose, does what you tell them to do.
To learn more.

3 comments:

1hose韻如ak09r_cruickshan said...

may the blessing be with you.........................................

Tony said...

Those individuals that do not prepare for their retirement investments while working find it hard to survive without job. They tend to look for another work even if they are retired just to meet their needs.

enquiries said...

Pension Release or "unlocking" is the term used for taking the benefits from your pension before you retire and getting up to the maximum tax free cash and/or maximum income.

You could even recover the money you've released by moving to a better performing investment than the one you currently have such as a SIPP.